Reading List: Readicide

readicide

I am currently enjoying reading this book.  It takes a look at how national education policy has killed the love of reading for students across the country.  It takes a hard look at how No Child Left Behind and high-stakes testing have been a major detriment to the overall literacy rate in America.

Most importantly, it explains how, we as schools, can curb this alarming trend and promote the love of literature in the hearts and minds of the students whom we serve.  I will have a more detailed review up when I finish reading.  In the meanwhile, I encourage you to check it out.

25 Professional Growth Conferences for 2016

Came across this great list of conferences in an edchat on Twitter.  Great resource if you are looking to attend a national professional development conference but don’t know where to begin.

I will be attending at least two of these.  In February I will be attending the TCEA Conference.  I also hope to attend the iNACOL conference in October.

I have copied the conferences upcoming for January into this post.

You can find the complete list at 25 PD Conferences for 2016

Keep Growing!

 

JANUARY

FETC-2016-Logo

Jan. 12-15
Orlando, FL

Find us at Booth 2117! FETC provides educators and administrators the opportunity to explore the integration of technology across the curriculum through hands-on exposure to the latest hardware, software and successful strategies.

NJECC_Logo2

Jan. 13
Montclair, NJ

The NJECC annual conference promotes and supports the integration of technology in K-12 education as it applies to student learning, professional development, leadership and instructional planning.

logo

Jan. 28-29
Atlantic City, NJ

Find us in the exhibit hall! The 21st annual Techspo exhibition and training conference for school leaders, sponsored by the New Jersey Association of School Administrators.

educon

Jan. 29-31
Philadelphia, PA

EduCon is an innovation conference where we can come together, both in person and virtually, to discuss the future of schools. Every session will be an opportunity to discuss and debate ideas—from the very practical to the big dreams.

ISTE_EdTechTeam_logo

Jan. 30-31
Oxon Hill, MD

Stop by our table! This two-day high-intensity event from EdTechTeam focuses on deploying, integrating, and using Google Apps for Education (and other Google tools) to promote student learning in K-12 and higher education.

Article: Why Education Reform is Doomed

Check out this fascinating article on why education reform in America is doomed.  The author takes a look at the huge success stories seen over in Finland and compares that to what is being done in America.

I will give you one hint, Finland is not pushing nationalized standardized testing.

Click the link to read the article:

http://www.cleveland.com/opinion/index.ssf/2015/03/why_us_education_reform_is_doo.html

High Stakes Testing: It’s Broke, yet We keep doing It

There is an old adage, “If it is broke, don’t fix it.”  Unfortunately, education in America is broke, yet we aren’t fixing it.

Extensive research has reached the conclusion that high stakes testing is a net negative and does not aid in student achievement.  

I have had the fortune of discussing testing with numerous public school educators.  They share these sentiments.  I often hear how they would love to focus on learning and the curriculum rather than teach in an environment of high stakes testing.

I feel for those educators.  Ultimately, we all want the same thing.  We all want our students to succeed.  

The following was published by NCTE and gives a summary of the research that has been accomplished regarding high stakes testing.  I have found it as a good resource in talking with other educators, parents, and policy makers on education reform.

•Afflerbach, P. (2005). High stakes testing and reading assessment: National reading conference policy brief. Journal of Literacy Research, 37(2), 151-162.

This reading brief describes the liabilities associated with high-stakes testing, including lack of research supporting a link between testing with reading achievement.EndFragment.

•Amrein, A.L. & Berliner, D.C. (2003). The effects of high-stakes testing on student motivation and learning. Educational Leadership, 60(5), 32- 38.

Research suggests that high-stakes testing creates less intrinsic student motivation and alienates students from self-directed learning. Topics include how high-stakes testing has impacted the rate of high school dropouts and student retention.

 

•Huempfner, L. (2004).  Can one size fit all?  The imperfect assumptions of parallel achievement tests for bilingual students.  Bilingual Research Journal, 28, 379-399.

This article focuses on some of the faulty assumptions that are made in the development of large-scale assessments for Spanish-speaking English language learners and argues that new measures need to be taken to assure that these tests reflect the best interests of the populations to whom they are administered.

•Neill, M. (2003). The dangers of testing. Educational Leadership. 60(5), 43-46.

The author suggests that high-stakes testing often impedes higher-level learning and skilled teaching because of the one-sided focus on test results. Data reveals that standardized testing has not led to an improvement in academic achievement.
•Triplett, C. (2005). Third through Sixth Graders’ Perceptions of High-Stakes Testing. Journal of Literacy Research 37(2), 237-260.

This study examined attitudes towards high-stakes testing by asking 225 elementary students to draw a picture and write a description that reflected their recent testing experiences.  Results indicate students’ negativity toward and anxiety concerning high-stakes tests.